Archive for November, 2012

November 26, 2012

Two Things I Learned This Thanksgiving

The two lessons below may seem straightforward, and perhaps well known by my readers. But here is what I learned this Thanksgiving (besides the fact that my 12-14 lb. turkey that I made for leftovers was insufficient. I made it on Saturday, and came home this afternoon to discover that all but the broth is GONE!!!).

Lesson 1. Simple Is Best

I am always looking for new vegetable sides to serve with Thanksgiving. For many years we have made a broccoli-lemon-garlic-parmesan sautee that we love. But not everyone is as crazy about it as we are. So, I was browsing my many recipe-filled magazines and came across a recipe for Roasted Vegetables from Eating Well.  Featuring both garlic and capers, we were pretty sure that we’d love it. Oh, and all it really required was chopping, seasoning, roasting, and then drizzling with a dressing made with said garlic and capers. Easy-peasy, and delicious. And an even better bonus … it was a great way to use the fall vegetables that had been featured in our CSA in the weeks leading up to Thanksgiving. Pics below, check Eating Well for the full recipe.

Not Quite As Pretty As The Professional Photo….But They Sure Tasted Good

Lesson 2. Make Your Own Cranberry Sauce

Nuff said. Why did I ever buy a can?! All you need to do is heat up 3/4 cup of orange juice, add a bit of sugar, some cinnamon and nutmeg, and some grated fresh ginger… Heat until the sugar dissolves…Stir in the cranberries and heat for about 5 minutes or until they “pop.”  If you are so inclined, stir in some pecans or walnuts. My husband has never ever commented on the cranberry sauce. He felt compelled to try this one and exclaimed…”Why haven’t we been making it this way all along?”  Good question, dear one.

 

What did you learn over your Thanksgiving holidays? Hopefully something wonderful.

November 24, 2012

Through The CSA Seasons

Our autumn CSA is done, we are moving into the dark days for fresh produce, and it is time to step back and reflect on what we received from the farm this year.  Sometimes, it is important to just look at the wide variety of produce and be amazed. I am still learning how to make sure that I either eat or preserve all the produce we receive, and since this summer produced many unwelcome changes to my life, I have a New Year’s resolution all set. In fact, the resolution is starting now as I acquire cookbooks and read all of my favorite blogs, and gather resources that will be at my fingertips when I need them starting next June.  Oh, and I really need to make sure that I capture what we pick up ALL season. I realized that I am missing photos from almost the entire Autumn CSA. Here’s hoping that your CSA filled your fridge and your belly with abundance this year.

Week 1: An abundance of green

Week 2: Colors Begin

Week 3: And Then There Was More. The Fennel Took Over The Fridge.

Week 4: Two Baskets Worth of Comida

Week 5: Moving Into The Golden and Ruby Season

Week 7: Tomatoes and Corn. Must Be Midsummer.

Week 9: Abundance!

Week 10: Time for Gazpacho.

Week 12. The First CSA After the Beach. The Butternut Squash Brings Intimations Of Fall.

Week 14. Okra, Broad Beans, Canary Melon. Gumbo?

The Last CSA Delivery of 2012. My First Grain Ever From the CSA!

November 11, 2012

Some Recipes On My To Try List

http://m.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/food/recipes-make-it-freeze-it-take-it/2012/11/06/0d5e363e-2792-11e2-b4f2-8320a9f00869_gallery.html

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November 1, 2012

Our Slow Slide Into Eating Local

When did the local eating – which now seems entirely normal –  begin? Was it our time in Bolivia, when local was mostly the only  food we had? Was it with that first North Carolina peach eagerly awaited and lovingly described by my then fiance (and now husband) as we drove from Chicago to Ocracoke, and then consumed in one delicious minute? Was it when we lived in Southern California and bags of oranges awaited us at the weekly market? Who knows? All of these experiences, and many others, feed our now routine local habit.

Since we have returned to Northern Virginia, we have slowly but surely replaced much of what we eat with locally sourced food.

We started out with the farmer’s market. Produce and bread were our main purchases. Berries, apples, asparagus, and peaches were eagerly anticipated and rapidly consumed.

This initial entre was accompanied by a vegetable and herb garden of our own. Tomatoes were the primary focus here.

We began to purchase bacon at the market and slowly purchased more and more of our meat from the market.

Next up was the CSA. Weekly produce deliveries of what was most bountiful. After an underwhelming start, we now rely on the CSA from June through November. The CSA has expanded our produce comsumption and we now look forward to garlic scapes, butternut squash, and bok choy!

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