Archive for December, 2012

December 31, 2012

The Family Foodie Survival Guide’s 2012 in review

So, why do I love Word Press? Because of features like this! I was going to be generative and create a new blog from the annual report they generated for me, but I can’t make such cool fireworks! My takeaway from my summary — people like clam chowder and pie.  Hope to see more of you all over 2013 … I certainly plan to do more writing and to explore the photography angle with my new camera!!  Thanks to my regular visitors, and to those new to the blog.

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 4,000 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 7 years to get that many views.

Click here to see the complete report.

December 26, 2012

Holiday Highlights From The Family Foodie!

It has been a festive time for the foodies in our house.  We started with a Christmas Eve goose!  Cooked simply, that is, just like a turkey, it roasted quickly in the oven, and served as our centerpiece for Christmas Eve dinner. 

Christmas Eve Goose

Accompanied with roasted curry cauliflower (from the farmer’s market) and sweet potatoes (from our CSA), everyone devoured it all up. Rich, we didn’t need huge amounts to sate our hunger.

Goose Meat

After a breakfast of pumpkin muffins, we laid out our traditional Christmas brunch featuring products from two of our favorite local stores, Arrowine and The German Gourmet.

Christmas Brunch Spread

And then this morning, we made Ho Ho Hole-y Popovers….

An extraordinarily simple recipe, but one that I have resisted making — for no good reason at all — because they are super dooper easy. On my husband’s recommendation (and he is the popover expert in this house), I followed the Joy of Cooking recipe. 

You start out with a few simple ingredients (we doubled the recipe) and a preheated 450 degree oven:

  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 tablespoon of melted butter
  • 1 cup sifted all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

All You Need For Popovers

While you let the ingredients get to room temperature, butter the muffin (or if you have them popover) tins.

Then beat (or stir in my case) those ingredients until smooth.  Then you add in 2 beaten eggs.

Adding The Eggs One At A Time

Fill the buttered baking cups three-fourths full, and bake at once.

After 15 minutes, lower the heat WITHOUT PEEPING to 350 degrees and bake about 20 minutes longer.

Then you can take them out and they will look like this:

Fresh from the oven

Gently release them from the baking tin and serve.

If you are a young child, you might want to turn yours upside down and put the butter in from the bottom.

Holy Popover!

 

If you are more interested to see what they look like inside, before you add the butter and jam, you can slice them open.

Popover AirCool huh?!

We served our popovers with some sausages from one of our favorite vendors at the market, and apple cider.

Day After Christmas Breakfast

Here’s hoping that you have been having a wonderful holiday season … and that warm popovers are in your future!

 

December 3, 2012

The SOLE Routine in the Dark Days

It’s relatively easy to eat locally in the summer season. The market is overflowing with more abundance than one can possibly cook, and the CSA delivers overflowing bags of produce, and the garden outside of the kitchen door ALWAYS has something that needs to be cooked.  But as the month of December dawns, the farmers’ markets are dwindling in size, the CSA has stopped, and although our arugula is trying hard to keep on growing (and 65 degrees today surely helped), our garden is no longer a reliable source of food.

So, what is a family to do when we are trying to eat at least one  entirely SOLE-sourced meal (for those of you new to this acronym…that is Sustainable, Organic, Local, and Ethical)?

Well this family is truly blessed to live where we do — because although the types of local food clearly reflect the realities of the winter season, we are by no means deprived.

In fact, at our market on Saturday (East Falls Church Market, our regular Saturday market), we saw, and purchased, this incredible ruby-leaved lettuce.

Can you believe the rich color of the leaves? Oh and they are delicious too!

Can you believe the rich color of the leaves? Oh and they are delicious too!

Now this lettuce played a starring role in salads that accompanied dinner both Saturday and Sunday. But before I share that with you, let me tell you our other SOLE sources over the winter season.

Our walkable Westover Farmer’s Market just got approval for a Sunday morning market, so we can get our favorite bacon and newest favorite bread (Portuguese corn bread)!

And on Tuesday morning, we wake up to our milk and eggs from South Mountain, as well as whatever else we have decided to order (Swiss cheese and sweet bologna for tomorrow).

If I need some chicken for dinner midweek or some local beer and wine, I’ll head over to The Westover Market and Beer Haus, and for some jam and organic grains The Local Market is a great source….

And so really, runs to my local grocery store are reduced to TP, organic beans and rice, and citrus needs.  I am pretty sure that I can live like this for a  long time.

And our local meals for the weekend?

Saturday morning:

Sunday morning:

Sunday night:

Easy as can be, right?

If you’d like to see what my fellow SOLE-food bloggers are up to this winter, please follow along at our Google Reader log.  Lots of wonderful stories to read, and if you eat venison, apparently we will learn lots about different ways to prepare it from Annie and Susan this winter!

Please do join in … we are looking forward to an awesome adventure through the winter months.

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